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April Is Poetry Month

The month of April is Poetry month, and Harper Collins has some of the best books to celebrate this month. And of course we love our books we recieve, and have a pretty book collection. The books they have for this month are great for all the little ones, and the older ones too. 

 

Here are some picture books for the younger ones to enjoy:

Honey, I Love

Honey I love

Honey, I Love by the Coretta Scott King Award-winning team Eloise Greenfield and Jan Spivey Gilchrist is now in paperback!

To one young narrator, it’s the simple things that mean the most, like sharing laughter with a friend, taking family rides in the country, and kissing her mama’s arm. This paperback edition of the classic poem by Eloise Greenfield with illustrations by Jan Spivey Gilchrist is sure to delight a new generation of readers.

 

In The Land Of Words

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This treasured poetry collection by Coretta Scott King Award-winning collaborators Eloise Greenfield and Jan Spivey Gilchrist journeys to a place where words, creativity, and imagination abound. Featuring twenty-one poems illustrated with sewn fabric collages, this tribute to the written word invites readers to look within themselves to discover what inspires them.

Eloise Greenfield, winner of the National Council of Teachers of English Excellence in Poetry for Children Award, says: The words can come from a memory, or a dream, or something I see or hear or wonder about or imagine. . . . Maybe there’s a place where words live, where our minds and hearts can go and find them when we want to write or read. I like to imagine that there is such a place. I call it “The Land of Words.”

My Chinatown

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My Chinatown is a critically acclaimed, spectacularly illustrated picture book homage to family, culture, and a childhood spent in one of the most striking places in any city—Chinatown. Kam Mak grew up in a place of two cultures, one existing within the other. Using extraordinarily beautiful paintings and moving poems, he shares a year of growing up in this small city within a city.

My Chinatown explores a boy’s first year in the United States—after emigrating from China—as he grows to love his new home in Chinatown through food, games, and the people surrounding him. Through Kam Mak’s spare verse and richly detailed artwork, the streets of Chinatown come vividly alive.

 This Is Earth

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Young readers learn how they can create a greener, healthier world in this powerful nonfiction picture book from authors Diane Z. Shore and Jessica Alexander, with art by award-winning illustrator Wendell Minor.

This Is the Earth explores hundreds of years of changing landscapes and the positive and negative impacts humans have had on the environment. Even the smallest actions can help save the world, and this lyrical, rhyming read-aloud text shows how smart and simple everyday habits can protect the planet.

For the middle School Grade

The Secret Destiny Of Pixie Piper

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Pixie Piper, an ordinary fifth grader, discovers she is a direct descendant of Mother Goose—and she has the magical ability and poetry power to prove it! A lively and funny twist on a classic character for fans of the Clementine books, Wendy Mass, and Lisa Graff. This is the first of two books about Pixie Piper, and it features black-and-white spot art throughout.

Fifth grader Pixie Piper has always known that she was a little different. She has a wild mop of hair that won’t stay put, her best friend is a boy, and to top it all off, she’s constantly coming up with rhymes and poems that just seem to pop out of her. Then, when Pixie thinks it can’t get any worse, she finds out that she actually is different—she’s a descendant of Mother Goose! This surprising and clever novel features family, friendship, poetry, a toilet museum, and just the right amount of magic, as well as a goose, a fox, and a beautiful golden retriever puppy. Rich, multigenerational characters and the real and powerful portrayal of grade-school friendships, with all their ups and downs, distinguish this terrific elementary school story that will appeal to fans of Judy Moody, Clementine, and novels by Wendy Mass and Lisa Graff.

 

And then theres this one for the young adult

Ask Me How I Got Here

how did i get here

How do you define yourself? By your friends? Your family? Your boyfriend? Your grades? Your trophies? Your choices? By a single choice? From the author of the acclaimed Poisoned Apples comes a novel in verse about a young woman and the aftermath of a life-altering decision. Fans of Laurie Halse Anderson and Ellen Hopkins will find the powerful questions, the difficult truths, and the inner strength that speak to them in Ask Me How I Got Here.

Addie has always known what she was running toward, whether in cross country, in her all-girls Catholic school, or in love. Until she and her boyfriend—her sensitive, good-guy boyfriend—are careless one night, and she gets pregnant. Addie makes the difficult choice to have an abortion. And after that—even though she knows it was the right decision for her—nothing is the same. She doesn’t want anyone besides her parents and her boyfriend to know what happened; she doesn’t want to run cross country anymore; she can’t bring herself to be excited about anything. Until she reconnects with Juliana, a former teammate who’s going through her own dark places. Once again, Christine Heppermann writes with an unflinching honesty and a deep sensitivity about the complexities of being a teenager, being a woman. Her free verse poems are moving, provocative, and often full of wry humor and a sharp wit.

 

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